Category — Holy Roman Empire

Saturday, October 28. 1704.

Numb. 68.
[285]

OUR last Review brought on the great Argument of the Hungarians being the Causes of the War with the Turks, in 1682.

And first, I might ask our Opponents to produce any other Reason for that War; and to shew us, what even the Turks themselves had to alledge against the Emperor?

In all the Embassies the Emperor made to the Port, and in all the Treaties with the Turks, there was not one Pretence ever offered, why the Port was disgusted; no such thing as Reparation or Satisfaction Demanded, but in the last offer, which the Turk ever made to the Emperor; this was the main thing the Bassa insisted on, viz. That it should be Lawful for the Turks to assist the Malecontents of Hungaria.

Now let any Man but consider, what sort of a Peace this must have been, that the Emperor must have been ty’d up to have acted no Hostilities on the Turks, and at the same time they were at Liberty to have brought down the whole Force of the Ottoman Empire upon him, under the specious sham of assisting the Hungarians[Read more →]

October 31, 2008   No Comments

Tuesday, October 24. 1704.

Numb. 67.
[281]

IN my Account of the Hungarians, I think I have plainly enough distinguish’d, that I am of Opinion, those of them call’d Protestants, were not either the first in the Design, or first in the Execution, of the Revolt from the Emperor; but as they came at last, to joyn in the general Revolution of Affairs, and to have the deepest share in the Suffering part, ’tis necessary I should say something to let the World see how far they were, or were not, concern’d in it.

I can not but think ’tis a little hard, that some who are tender of the Reputation of the Protestants, should be so Partial, as to believe I should not do them Justice in this Relation, or so impatient, as not to wait till the Course of the Story brought me to it.

The Reflection made on the Relation, and on the Author, have so little weight in them, that I have not really thought them worth Notice hitherto, and shall only touch on them now; To say of the Author, he has chang’d his Principles, and writes to please a Party, is to show themselves as Weak as Malicious; since as in all his Practice, no Man can be nam’d that has more to his Personal Prejudice, despised the Partiality of Parties, and is not asham’d to affirm, that as no Party in the World can make him an offer large enough to Tempt him to forsake his Principles, so neither can they Terrify him from owning the Truth, which he has always adher’d to.

Nor is this at all concern’d in his Writing of the Hungarian Malecontents; and if these Censorious Gentlemen please to have Patience, they will find the Author of these Sheets freely declaring himself upon the Principle of Salus Populi Suprema lex, as often as there shall be occasion; and sufficiently to defend himself from the Scandal of shifting his Principles. [Read more →]

October 24, 2008   Comments Off

Tuesday, October 17. 1704.

Numb. 65.
[273]

THE Defeat of Count Teckely, and the Bassa of Great Warradin near Presburgh, was but the beginning of their Sorrows; about 12 days after the said Fight, he joyn’d another Body of Hungarians and Tartars, and Passing the River Mark, entred Moravia, Burnt and Ravag’d 16 or 18 Villages, in a most Barbarous manner, and Summon’d the whole Province to pay him Contribution.

The Duke of Lorrain Detach’d 500 Polanders, and 800 German Horse, with 200 Dragoons, to advance and put a stop to them, till the rest of the Army could be got together. This small Detachment met the Malecontents, at a River near Ancren, in Moravia; and being surrounded by them, were oblig’d to Charge their whole; Whether it was the extraordinary Bravery of the Imperialists, or which is more likely, the Hungarians intimidated and dispirited by the foulness of their Cause, and the hand of Heaven, we cannot be certain; but this small Party of 1500 Men, routed their whole Army, Kill’d 500 Men, Took 2000 Prisoners, 12 of their Standards, and recover’d all their Plunder, and particularly above 3000 poor Country People, who the Tartars had taken Prisoners, designing to sell them to the Turks.

Thus the Turks went on Prosperously enough with their Siege, yet the Hungarians were Beaten on all occasions.

Count Teckely, to be reveng’d for their Affront, obtains 2000 Turkish Horse of the Grand Visier, and joyning to them 1000 of his own, under a Brother of Count Budiani, Orders them to pass the River Waagh, and Ravage the Frontiers of the Hereditary Conntries between the Mark and Moravia; but the Duke of Lorrain sending Orders to some of the Saxon Forces which were on their March for the Relief of Vienna, they laid a Snare for them, and drew them into an Ambuscade, which unexpectedly surrounding them, cut them all off, or took them Prisoners; among the latter, the Young Count Budiani was Taken, and died of his Wounds, and Teckely’s Secretary was kill’d. [Read more →]

October 17, 2008   No Comments

Saturday, October 14. 1704.

Numb. 64.
[269]

THE Success of the Hungarians, under Count Teckely, after they had put themselves under the Protection of the Turk, is the present Subject we are upon; whether God Almighty, in his Righteous Providence, Punish’d them for their Infidelity and Distrust, in quitting their Dependence upon his Omnipotence, and flying to his Enemies for Aid; whether it was for their Disloyalty to the Emperor, or for their Cruelties in the Execution of their Resentments against the Germans; or for what other Reasons, I am willing to leave that Particular undecided.

’Tis my proper Business to make out the Fact, as I have alledg’d it in several past Papers; viz. That from the time that they abandon’d their Faith, Revolted from, and Betray’d the Christian Army, under the Duke of Lorrain, on the River Raab; the Consequences of which, were that dreadful Eruption of the Tartars into the German part of Lower Hungary, into Austria, Stiria, and Moravia; the Destruction of a Plentiful, Flourishing, and some of it Protestant Country, for above 100 Miles Square; the Murther or Captivity of above 40000 Innocent Christians, the Retreat or Flight of the Imperial Army, and after that the Siege of Vienna: From this time the Divine Protection visibly forsook them, and Heaven seem’d plainly to have left them to the Vengeance and Punishment of their own ways, fill’d them with their own doings, and they fell before the Germans as Grass beneath the hands of the Mower.

The first instance of this we have in Sir Roger Manley’s History aforemention’d, under the Head of the Seige of Vienna.

The Hungarians, who, as has been already Noted, Concerted Measures with the Grand Visier at Buda, had contriv’d effectually to Secure the Ruin of Vienna, by placing themselves on the Borders of Austria, so Securing the Passes of the Mountains on that side, effectually to prevent the King of Poland, who was then on his March to Relive the City; had they Succeeded in their Design, the Poles could not have come at all, or else must have March’d so far about, that it had been impossible for Vienna, which, as it was, found it self reduc’d to the last extremity, to have held out till their Arrival. [Read more →]

October 14, 2008   No Comments